Ginkgo, pawpaw, hickory and other exciting things

It may be difficult to imagine how even the forest garden will evolve over time. To get a better sense of how different plants behave and how big they can get, I usually take the opportunity to visit the botanical gardens when I am traveling. Most of these gardens are quite a few trees and shrubs that are of interest to plant forest gardens, and there are few other places where you can look at that old individuals in the botanical gardens.

A couple of weeks ago I happened to be in Bonn, Germany, and visited the city's fine Botanical Garden, belonging to one of the most well-stocked as I have seen. I peered primarily by full-grown nut trees, which can be difficult to find in the Nordic countries and became anything but disappointed. There were all sorts of hickory (Carya spp.), of which, namely ski hickory (Carya ovata) are planted in forests garden ant Putt. The nuts were also here in Germany is very small and hardly worth growing if you disregard the high-value timber trees provide.

Another unusual nut is ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), which is growing pretty well up to odlingszon 3 in Sweden. The copy in Bonn was a female plant for pollination as it had been grafted with a male plant. The result was a strangely shaped tree with an incredible number of nuts that were almost ripe.

It nötbärande ginkgo tree (Ginkgo biloba)
It nötbärande ginkgo tree (Ginkgo biloba)

Lately I have become interested in oaks with acorns with low tanninhalter. In Spain there is a variant of stone oak (Quercus ilex subsp. rotundifolia) which has sweet acorn and the oak species should be of similar quality even for our climate. In Bonn, I found both very fruity oak (Quercus macrocarpa) and Quercus bicolor, that seems to be the hardiest among the honeymoon quarks. Both of these will be planted in Putt Myra forest garden for spring.

Quercus bicolor, a hardy oak from North America with sweet acorn.
Quercus bicolor, a hardy oak from North America with sweet acorn.

Although Chestnut (Castanea spp.) I have high hopes for, and this spring we planted two Chinese chestnuts (Castanea mollissima) in Putt Ant forest garden. In Bonn, there was a seven year old seedling that showed that the species typical sprawling plant way. Unfortunately bar tree no fruit, it would have been fun to see how big the chestnuts become really.

Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima), a hot candidate for a starchy forest garden plant in northern latitudes.
Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima), a hot candidate for a starchy forest garden plant in northern latitudes.

Even the walnut interested can be satisfied in Bonn. There were about a dozen species of walnut genus (Juglans spp.) where, many of which I had never heard of. Interesting for me was gray walnut (Juglans cinerea) which may be resistant to the growth zone 4 or even zone 5 and black walnut (Juglans nigra) that is hardy to zone might 4 and become large trees with straight trunk. However, the black walnut is known to have some of the best brews nuts.

Black walnut (Juglans cinerea) among the hardiest walnuts. In the city park in Örebro, there are a number of stately specimen.
Black walnut (Juglans cinerea) among the hardiest walnuts. In the city park in Örebro, there are a number of stately specimen.

Besides all the numerous nut trees there were of course lots of different fruit trees on display in Bonn. The tree perhaps left the biggest impression was pawpaw tree (Asimina triloba), I've never seen in full size plant. Fruits, to taste the banana, pineapple and vanilla at the same time, unfortunately, was not ripe yet. In Sweden, pawpaw probably grow in sheltered positions in growth zone 3 and we will make an attempt to plant a couple of copies of the new greenhouse next to Putt Myra forest garden.

Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) among the most exotic fruits we can grow in the forest garden. Unfortunately, it is not so hardy and survive at best in sheltered positions in growth zone 3.
Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) among the most exotic fruits we can grow in the forest garden. Unfortunately, it is not so hardy and survive at best in sheltered positions in growth zone 3.

For those of you who do not want to go all the way to Bonn, I can recommend two botanical gardens, both of which have extensive and interesting collections: Botanical Garden in Uppsala and Bergius Botanical Garden i Stockholm .

4 thoughts on “Ginkgo, pawpaw, hickory and other exciting things”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.